Stories about: Information technology

Pitching pediatric innovation at SXSW Interactive

Pitching pediatric digital health innovationsJudy Wang, MS, is a program manager in the Telehealth Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

A major theme at Taking on Tomorrow 2014 was the difficulty in making the business case for innovation in pediatrics, since the market size is small relative to the adult market. Muna AbdulRaqqaq Tahlak, MD, CEO of Latifa Hospital in Dubai, was among many who urged innovators to collaborate and aggregate their data to make the most impact.

It’s in that spirit that the upcoming Impact Pediatric Health Startup Pitch Competition (March 16) was born. Hosted by organizers of the South by Southwest Interactive (SXSWi) conference in Austin and the four top pediatric hospitals in the country—Boston Children’s, Cincinnati Children’s, Texas Children’s and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia—the event will identify the most promising digital health and medical device innovations for pediatrics.

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CES offers a glimpse into the connected health future

Bluetooth pacifier thermometer CES Consumer Electronics Show health gadgets wearables
A Bluetooth pacifier/thermometer? (Photo: Bluemaestro

A Bluetooth pacifier that takes a baby’s temperature. An iPhone otoscope. A smart yoga mat. And health & fitness trackers out the wazoo. That’s just a small sampling of the health-related technologies showcased at last week’s Consumer Electronics Show (or CES).

The Las Vegas-based annual trade fair, a weeklong playdate for gadgetphiles, largely focuses on TVs, computers, cameras, entertainment and mobile gear. This year it also had a robust health and biotech presence, with more than 300 health and biotech exhibitors.

“I witnessed literally hundreds of companies all vying for the wrists and attention of users,” Michael Docktor, MD, Boston Children’s Hospital’s clinical director of innovation and director of clinical mobile solutions, wrote on BetaBoston. “For me, it was a chance to see where medicine and health care are headed.”

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Mapping mosaicism: Tracing subtle mutations in our brains

brain genetic mosaicism
(Erik Jacobsen, Threestory Studio. Used with permission.)
DNA sequences were once thought to be the same in every cell, but the story is now known to be more complicated than that. The brain is a case in point: Mutations can arise at different times in brain development and affect only a percentage of neurons, forming a mosaic pattern.

Now, thanks to new technology described last week in Neuron, these subtle “somatic” brain mutations can be mapped spatially across the brain and even have their ancestry traced.

Like my family, who lived in Eastern Europe, migrated to lower Manhattan and branched off to Boston, California and elsewhere, brain mutations can be followed from the original mutant cells as they divide and migrate to their various brain destinations, carrying their altered DNA with them.

“Some mutations may occur on one side of the brain and not the other,” says Christopher Walsh, MD, PhD, chief of Genetics and Genomics at Boston Children’s Hospital and co-senior author on the paper. “Some may be ‘clumped,’ affecting just one gyrus [fold] of the brain, disrupting just a little part of the cortex at a time.”

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Intelligent ICU monitoring for patients in status epilepticus: BurSIn

The BurSIn system, in development, interprets EEG data along several key parameters and accurately identifies burst and suppression patterns.
The BurSIn system, in development, interprets EEG data along several key parameters and accurately identifies burst and suppression patterns.

Status epilepticus, a life-threatening form of persistent seizure activity in the brain, is challenging to treat. It requires hospitalization in an intensive care unit, constant monitoring and meticulous medication adjustment. An automated, intelligent monitoring system developed by clinicians and engineers at Boston Children’s Hospital could transform ICU care for this neurological emergency.

Typically, children in status epilepticus are first given powerful, short-acting seizure medications. If their seizures continue, they may need to be placed in a medically induced coma, using long-acting sedatives or general anesthetics. “The goal,” explains biomedical engineer Christos Papadelis, PhD, “is to supply enough sedating medication to suppress brain activity and protect the brain from damage, while at the same time avoiding over-sedation.”

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15 health care predictions for 2015

Crystal ball fortuneteller-Shutterstock-cropped
2014 continued to see massive evolution in health care—from digital health innovations to the maturation of technologies in genomics, genome editing and regenerative medicine to the configuration of the health care system itself. We asked leaders from the clinical, research and business corners of Boston Children’s Hospital to weigh in with their forecasts for 2015. Click “Full story” for them all, or jump to:
The consumer movement in health care
Evolving care models
Genomics in medicine
Stem cell therapeutics
Therapeutic development
New technology
Biomedical research

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Health care in a hyper-connected world: Cisco’s Carlos Dominguez

Part of a series of videotaped sessions from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014.

Carlos Dominguez is a technology evangelist, social media maven and a Senior VP at the IT company Cisco Systems, Inc. In this animated keynote presentation, he poses the question: how can health care organizations innovate in a world transformed by the web, social media and mobile phones, where “distance is dead,” knowledge is totally democratized and kids are born digital? Innovation isn’t luck, he contends, it’s a discipline that should work its way into an organization’s DNA.

Click here for full coverage of the Global Pediatric Innovation Summit. Videos are also available on YouTube.

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Pathways to market for medical devices

compass_antique_map

You’ve got a great idea for a new medical device. After you’ve created the device and proved its usefulness in a clinical setting—a challenge in itself—the next step is getting your device to a commercial partner who can mass-produce and market it. Working through all of the regulatory hurdles, projecting the market for your product and figuring out your product’s long term potential can seem overwhelming.

“The more you know, the more prepared you will be,” says Pedro del Nido, MD, chair of the Department of Cardiac Surgery at Boston Children’s Hospital and principal investigator on the FDA-funded Boston Pediatric Device Consortium. “The more prepared you are, the more likely you will be successful.”

On January 6, 2015, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., del Nido will lead a panel discussion at Boston Children’s about moving medical devices from idea to commercial partnership,

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IBM’s Watson at work: Transforming health care

Part of a continuing series of videotaped sessions at Boston Children’s Hospital’s recent Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014.

What’s IBM’s Watson been up to since winning Jeopardy? Among other things, it’s been trying to help doctors make decisions. “We live in an age of information overload,” says Mike Rhodin, Senior Vice President of the IBM Watson Group. “The challenge is to now turn that information into knowledge.”

Interestingly, most of the inquiries Rhodin received post-Jeopardy were from doctors, who were interested in the way Watson sorted and ranked possible answers. Here, Rhodin and Dan Cerutti, VP of Watson Commercialization, outline IBM’s vision to improve global health care through a technology platform called CarePlex:

Stay tuned as we post more sessions from the Pediatric Innovation Summit (also available on YouTube) and read our blog coverage.

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Seeding medical innovation: The Technology Development Fund

Monique Yoakim Turk Technology Development FundMonique Yoakim-Turk, PhD, is a partner of the Technology Development Fund and associate director of the Technology and Innovation Development Office at Boston Children’s Hospital

Since 2009, Boston Children’s Hospital has committed $6.2 million to support 58 hospital innovations ranging from therapeutics, diagnostics, medical devices and vaccines to regenerative medicine and healthcare IT projects. What a difference six years makes.

The Technology Development Fund (TDF) was proposed to Boston Children’s senior leadership in 2008 after months of research. As a catalyst fund, the TDF is designed to transform seed-stage academic technologies at the hospital into independently validated, later-stage, high-impact opportunities sought by licensees and investors. In addition to funds, investigators get access to mentors, product development experts and technical support through a network of contract research organizations and development partners. TDF also provides assistance with strategic planning, intellectual property protection, regulatory requirements and business models.

Seeking some “metrics of success” beyond licensing numbers and royalties (which can come a decade or so after a license), I asked recipients of past TDF awards to report back any successes that owed at least in part to data generated with TDF funds. While we expected some of the results, we would have never anticipated such a large impact.

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The 98%: Proteomics reveals proteins made from ‘noncoding’ DNA

proteins and peptides from noncoding DNA
Probing the genome's 'dark side' could change our view of biology.
Vast chunks of our DNA—fully 98 percent of our genome—are considered “non-coding,” meaning that they’re not thought to carry instructions to make proteins. Yet we already know that this “junk DNA” isn’t completely filler. For example, some sequences are known to code for bits of RNA that act as switches, turning genes on and off.

New research led by Judith Steen, PhD, and Gabriel Kreiman PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Proteomics Center and Neurobiology program, goes much further in mapping this “dark side” of the genome.

In a report published last month in Nature Communications, they describe a variety of proteins and peptides (smaller chains of amino acids) arising from presumed non-coding DNA sequences. Since they looked in just one type of cell—neurons—these molecules may only be the tip of a large, unexplored iceberg and could change our understanding of biology and disease.

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