From the category archives:

Ethics and policy

Third in a series of videotaped sessions at Boston Children’s Hospital’s recent Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014.

Ezekiel “Zeke” Emanuel MD, PhD, former health advisor to President Barack Obama and current Vice Provost for Global Initiatives and Chair of the Department of Medical Ethics & Health Policy at University of Pennsylvania, has plenty to say about where health care is headed. Keynoting at the Global Pediatric Summit 2014, Zeke outlines six predictions and what academic medical centers and the larger industry will need to do to survive.

Stay tuned as we post more sessions from the Pediatric Innovation Summit (also available on YouTube) and read our blog coverage.

Leave a comment

Paul Farmer, president and co-founder of Partners in Health, has dedicated his life to the idea that the problems of the world’s poorest people are humanity’s problems writ large. Having recently returned from West Africa, Farmer spoke at Harvard Medical School and appeared on the Colbert Report last week, calling for a stronger response to the Ebola outbreak.

“We want to have a radical inclusiveness,” Farmer told the Harvard Medical School audience. “We readily acknowledge that we are overwhelmed by this.” Full story »

Leave a comment

Spending on children with medical complexityJay Berry, MD, MPH, is a pediatrician and hospitalist in the Complex Care Service at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Growing up, my parents repeatedly reminded me that “money doesn’t grow on trees.” They pleaded with me to spend it wisely. I’ve recently been thinking a lot about my parents and how their advice might apply to health care spending for my patients.

As a general pediatrician with the Complex Care Service at Boston Children’s Hospital, I care for “medically complex” children. These children—numbering an estimated 500,000 in the U.S.— have serious chronic health problems such as severe cerebral palsy and Pompe disease. Many of them rely on medical technology, like feeding and breathing tubes, to help maintain their health.

These children are expensive to take care of. They make frequent health care visits and tend be high utilizers of medications and equipment. Some use the emergency department and the hospital so often that they’ve been dubbed frequent flyers. Full story »

2 comments

WilliamsDavidDSC_0056PreviewlargeDavid A. Williams, MD, is chief of hematology/oncology at Boston Children’s Hospital and associate chairman of pediatric oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. This column was first published on Huffington Post.

The fact that childhood cancer is, thankfully, rare belies the fact that it is the leading cause of disease-related death in U.S. children age 1 to 19. The number of people with a direct stake in expanding research into pediatric cancer is quite large, well beyond the small number of children with cancer and their families. Not only are the life-long contributions of children cured of cancer enormous, but understanding cancers of young children could also hold the key to understanding a broad range of adult cancers. The time is ripe to allocate more resources, public and private, to research on pediatric cancer.

In an age of increased understanding of the genetic basis of diseases, one thing is striking about many childhood cancers. They are relatively “quiet” cancers, with very few mutations of the DNA. Young children haven’t lived long enough to acquire the large number of mutations that create the background “noise” associated with years of living. This makes it much easier to pinpoint the relevant genetic abnormalities in a young child’s cancer.

Add to this the growing realization that biology, including how various tumors use common “pathways,” is a major factor in how the cancer responds to treatment. Thus, a mechanism that’s relatively easier to observe in the cancers of young children could help scientists understand cancers in adults, in whom the same mechanism is hidden amid the clutter of mutations acquired over a longer life. Full story »

Leave a comment

Patient handoff I-PASSIt’s increasingly clear that good health care is as much about communication as about using the best medical or surgical techniques. That’s especially true during the “handoff”—the transfer of a patient’s care from provider to provider during hospital shift changes. It’s a time when information is more likely to fall through the cracks or get distorted.

Now there’s solid proof that focusing on communications counts. Last week, The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) published a paper showing that implementing a set of handoff procedures and training tools led to a 30 percent drop in injuries from medical errors across the nine participating sites. Full story »

1 comment

Paul Solman Big Data data analytics health care

To kick off the final panel of the Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014, moderator Paul Solman (above), business and economics correspondent for PBS Newshour, launched straight into the question: What are we in healthcare doing with big data, and what should we be doing with it?

John Brownstein, PhD, director of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Computational Epidemiology Group and co-founder of HealthMap, said big data has had a significant positive effect on his group’s work. By incorporating social media into their data sets, he noted, they have been able to draw conclusions about large-scale infectious diseases in a matter of weeks.

Sachin Jain, MD, MBA, chief medical Information and innovation officer at Merck, took the role of devil’s advocate, making contrarian points about the “big data revolution.” “We’re not doing enough small data,” he said. “Everyone’s talking about predictive analytics, but they’re not doing basic analytics at the point of care.”

“Why can’t big data inform patient care at the point of care?” retorted panelist Joy Keeler Tobin, chief of health informatics at MITRE. Full story »

Leave a comment

Dallas map Ebola electronic health records

(Google Maps)

The Ebola situation in Dallas—with one patient death, two nurse exposures, dozens under quarantine, and talk last week of declaring a state of emergency in the city—has thrown into stark relief the gaps between public health and frontline clinical care. But those gaps also present opportunities to make public health data work harder and to change how doctors approach clinical care in times when events and information are changing at Internet speed.

That’s the gist of an editorial by Boston Children’s Hospital’s Kenneth Mandl, MD, MPH, published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

It comes down to making electronic health records (EHRs) work more flexibly, in ways that help promote situational awareness among clinicians during times of crisis and flag instances when a patient’s condition may require more attention than usual. Full story »

1 comment

Global Pediatric Innovation Summit Awards big dataWhere is the next generation of therapeutic innovations going to come from? Population-level genomic studies? The fitness trackers on everyone’s wrist? Mining electronic medical records? People’s tweets, Yelps and Facebook posts?

How about all of the above?

What all of these things have in common is data. Lots of it. Some of it represents kinds of data that didn’t exist 5 or 10 years ago, but all of it is slowly beginning to fuel the pharma sector’s efforts to create the next blockbuster drug or targeted therapeutic.

At least, it should be. Full story »

Leave a comment

Tamiflu influenza neuraminidase inhibitors conflicts of interest

(stanrandom/Flickr)

This winter, if your doctor suggests that you take Tamiflu, you might want to ask for a conflict of interest statement: a new study suggests that doctors who received payments from the makers of flu-fighting neuraminidase inhibitors—drugs like Tamiflu® and Relenza®—were more likely to view the drugs’ prowess in a favorable light.

In the study, published last week in the Annals of Internal Medicine, a team led by Boston Children’s Hospital’s Florence Bourgeois, MD, MPH, tallied up the financial connections of doctors who participated in 37 reviews of neuraminidase inhibitors.

While it’s been unclear for years whether these drugs really are effective against influenza, it was crystal clear that financial relationships are associated with positive reviews. Full story »

Leave a comment

Smartphone key lock privacy mobile health Kenneth MandlPrivacy policies are a sore point for Internet users. At least once a year the pitchforks and torches come out when a company like Facebook or Twitter changes its policies around how it uses, sells or secures users’ data—things like browsing habits, phone numbers, relationships and email addresses.

You don’t hear as much hue and cry over the privacy of mobile health apps, where people store and track what are literally their most intimate details. But perhaps you should.

Because in fact, a recent survey of mobile health apps led by Boston Children’s Hospital’s Kenneth Mandl, MD, MPH, finds that only about 30 percent of mobile health apps have any kind of policy covering the privacy of users’ data. Full story »

Leave a comment