From the category archives:

Information technology

proteins and peptides from noncoding DNA

Probing the genome's 'dark side' could change our view of biology.

Vast chunks of our DNA—fully 98 percent of our genome—are considered “non-coding,” meaning that they’re not thought to carry instructions to make proteins. Yet we already know that this “junk DNA” isn’t completely filler. For example, some sequences are known to code for bits of RNA that act as switches, turning genes on and off.

New research led by Judith Steen, PhD, and Gabriel Kreiman PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Proteomics Center and Neurobiology program, goes much further in mapping this “dark side” of the genome.

In a report published last month in Nature Communications, they describe a variety of proteins and peptides (smaller chains of amino acids) arising from presumed non-coding DNA sequences. Since they looked in just one type of cell—neurons—these molecules may only be the tip of a large, unexplored iceberg and could change our understanding of biology and disease. Full story »

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Patient handoff I-PASSIt’s increasingly clear that good health care is as much about communication as about using the best medical or surgical techniques. That’s especially true during the “handoff”—the transfer of a patient’s care from provider to provider during hospital shift changes. It’s a time when information is more likely to fall through the cracks or get distorted.

Now there’s solid proof that focusing on communications counts. Last week, The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) published a paper showing that implementing a set of handoff procedures and training tools led to a 30 percent drop in injuries from medical errors across the nine participating sites. Full story »

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Paul Solman Big Data data analytics health care

To kick off the final panel of the Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014, moderator Paul Solman (above), business and economics correspondent for PBS Newshour, launched straight into the question: What are we in healthcare doing with big data, and what should we be doing with it?

John Brownstein, PhD, director of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Computational Epidemiology Group and co-founder of HealthMap, said big data has had a significant positive effect on his group’s work. By incorporating social media into their data sets, he noted, they have been able to draw conclusions about large-scale infectious diseases in a matter of weeks.

Sachin Jain, MD, MBA, chief medical Information and innovation officer at Merck, took the role of devil’s advocate, making contrarian points about the “big data revolution.” “We’re not doing enough small data,” he said. “Everyone’s talking about predictive analytics, but they’re not doing basic analytics at the point of care.”

“Why can’t big data inform patient care at the point of care?” retorted panelist Joy Keeler Tobin, chief of health informatics at MITRE. Full story »

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The mobile and digital health market is evolving with great intensity and speed. The surge in wearable technology, health-related apps and the explosion of digital health communication continue to flood the marketplace.

Joseph Kvedar, MD, of Partners Healthcare’s Center for Connected Health—who took part in a think tank of panelists at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014—says this surge is the beginning of the “mHealth” revolution:

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BCH_InnoSummit14_RhodinMike-3The only machine to ever win a TV game show is now transforming the world of healthcare.

After winning Jeopardy in 2011, IBM’s Watson has moved on to bigger and better things. Mike Rhodin, Senior Vice President of the IBM Watson Group, told the audience at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014 how the cognitive computing system is being used to synthesize medical data and assist clinicians caring for complex patients.

“We live in an age of information overload,” Rhodin explained. “The challenge is to now turn that information into knowledge.” Full story »

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Dallas map Ebola electronic health records

(Google Maps)

The Ebola situation in Dallas—with one patient death, two nurse exposures, dozens under quarantine, and talk last week of declaring a state of emergency in the city—has thrown into stark relief the gaps between public health and frontline clinical care. But those gaps also present opportunities to make public health data work harder and to change how doctors approach clinical care in times when events and information are changing at Internet speed.

That’s the gist of an editorial by Boston Children’s Hospital’s Kenneth Mandl, MD, MPH, published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

It comes down to making electronic health records (EHRs) work more flexibly, in ways that help promote situational awareness among clinicians during times of crisis and flag instances when a patient’s condition may require more attention than usual. Full story »

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Hackers at Hacking PediatricsParents, clinicians, app developers, designers and more had 18 hours to prototype digital healthcare solutions at Hacking Pediatrics, produced by Boston Children’s Hospital and MIT Hacking Medicine. To accompany our earlier post, we created this Storify. Full story »

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Hacking Pediatarics brainstorming wall

(Dana Hatic for MedTech Boston)

What are the pain points in pediatrics? There are at least 37: the number of clinicians, parents and others who lined up at the podium last weekend to pitch problems they hoped to solve at the second annual Hacking Pediatrics.

The hackathon, produced by Boston Children’s Hospital in collaboration with MIT Hacking Medicine, brought out many common themes: Helping kids with chronic illnesses track their symptoms, take their meds and avoid lots of clinic visits. Helping parents coordinate their children’s care and locate resources. Helping pediatric clinicians make better decisions with the right information at the right time.

Hackathons have a simple formula: Pitch. Mix. Hack. Get Feedback. Iterate. Repeat—as many times as possible. Full story »

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Global Pediatric Innovation Summit Awards big dataWhere is the next generation of therapeutic innovations going to come from? Population-level genomic studies? The fitness trackers on everyone’s wrist? Mining electronic medical records? People’s tweets, Yelps and Facebook posts?

How about all of the above?

What all of these things have in common is data. Lots of it. Some of it represents kinds of data that didn’t exist 5 or 10 years ago, but all of it is slowly beginning to fuel the pharma sector’s efforts to create the next blockbuster drug or targeted therapeutic.

At least, it should be. Full story »

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Yelp iPhone Android social media foodborne illness food poisoning John Brownstein public health digital epidemiologyYou just had a great meal at a restaurant. So you grab your phone and fire off a glowing review on Yelp.

Consider the opposite scenario: You just had a horrible meal at a restaurant. So you grab your phone and fire off a scathing review on Yelp.

Now here’s one more: You had a great meal at a restaurant but woke up vomiting the next morning. Do you grab your phone and fire off a complaint on Yelp that your dinner made you sick?

That’s what a trio from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Informatics Program, are banking on.

A report in Preventive Medicine, authored by John Brownstein, PhD, Elaine Nsoesie, PhD and Sheryl Kluberg, MSc, judges Yelp’s usefulness as a food poisoning surveillance tool. Their efforts are part of a growing trend among public health researchers of trying to supplement traditional foodborne illness reporting with what we, the people, say on social media.

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