Stories about: Devices

CareAline: A mother’s road to SXSW

The CareAline wrap, modeled by Lochlan Fitzgerald
The CareAline wrap, modeled by Lochlan Fitzgerald. Below, the CareAline sleeve.

Our daughter, Saoirse, was diagnosed with cancer when she was 11 months old. Her care, safety and comfort were our first priorities. When she had a PICC line and later a central line placed to infuse drugs and fluids, we saw a need for a better way to keep these lines safe and secure without using skin-damaging tape and irritating mesh netting. Saoirse was tugging at her lines and trying to pull off the tape, so I handmade a fabric sleeve for her PICC line and a chest wrap for her central line, and she went back to playing and being a kid.

Initially we figured that would be the end of it.

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SXSW Interactive 2015: Our future selves, a maturing health tech industry and why failing is productive

SXSW Impact Pediatric HealthJudy Wang, MS, is a program manager in the Telehealth Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

In 2012, when I attended the South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive conference for the first time, health tech was still an emerging field. It was the first year the world’s leading conference for emerging technology and digital creativity made any effort to include health tech programming, and the first time its Accelerator pitch event included a category for health tech startups.

Only three years later, SXSW Interactive (March 13­–17, 2015) has grown to include almost 50 events related to health and medical technologies. Martine Rothblatt, CEO of the biotech company United Therapeutics, gave a keynote titled “AI, Immortality and the Future of Selves” that was both inspiring and provocative. She spoke to a world in which our 24/7 selves are increasingly being captured digitally. Audience questions captured by Twitter pondered the ethical implications of what Rothblatt called “mind clones”: future mechanical beings digitally programmed with our mannerisms, habits and memories.

This year also featured the Impact Pediatric Health pitch competition, captured in this Storify.

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What’s your innovation style? Lion or ant?

shutterstock_182805821From a series on researchers and innovators at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Kaifeng Liu, MD, a research fellow at Boston Children’s Hospital, takes his inspiration from ants.

“We’re often amazed by the power of large animals—whales, eagles, lions and tigers,” he says. “But these animals are genetically born with the strength to overpower other animals. Ants are small and hardworking. They work inch by inch and create a teamwork culture. Most of us are like ants. We have an average level of talent and are not able to perform like a lion. But we can work like ants and create beautiful things by working hard as part of a team—day by day, little by little.”

Liu has taken this inch-by-inch approach in a radical redesign of the conventional suturing needle: “I started to play with the surgical needle in graduate school in 1986.”

Nearly three decades later, Liu has devised an extremely short magnetic needle that transforms the current method of suturing—stitching with a needle and thread—that has been used for thousands of years.

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AudioHub app: Bringing hearing tests into the 21st century

sound wave AudioHub audiologyThere are 36 million Americans with hearing loss. Nearly 15 percent of children ages 6 to 19 have some level of hearing problems, according to the CDC, and the elderly population’s need for audiologic services is growing. Yet the number of audiologists is predicted to decrease in the coming years, increasing the need to make audiology practices more efficient.

For the past seven years, audiologists at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Enhancement have recorded hearing test results using an audiogram software application called Mi-Forms. The software was developed in 2007 to help with documentation. At the time, most audiology clinics used (and most still use) pen and paper, so Mi-Forms was a big advance. It’s been used by more than 90,000 Boston Children’s patients, reducing the clinic’s administrative burden by an estimated 11 percent.

However, over time, limitations became apparent.

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HD1829: Advancing telemedicine in Massachusetts

Massachusetts telehealth legislationJudy Wang, MS, is a program manager in the Telehealth Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

This post is a frank call to action. Massachusetts is one of the few remaining states in the country that does not provide coverage for telemedicine services through its Medicaid program, and credentialing and reimbursement issues have helped limit the expansion of telehealth programs at Boston Children’s Hospital and beyond.

That could change. Legislation supported by Boston Children’s Office of Government Relations, filed on January 16, includes a bill that would advance and expand access to telemedicine services across the Commonwealth.

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Pitching pediatric innovation at SXSW Interactive

Pitching pediatric digital health innovationsJudy Wang, MS, is a program manager in the Telehealth Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.

A major theme at Taking on Tomorrow 2014 was the difficulty in making the business case for innovation in pediatrics, since the market size is small relative to the adult market. Muna AbdulRaqqaq Tahlak, MD, CEO of Latifa Hospital in Dubai, was among many who urged innovators to collaborate and aggregate their data to make the most impact.

It’s in that spirit that the upcoming Impact Pediatric Health Startup Pitch Competition (March 16) was born. Hosted by organizers of the South by Southwest Interactive (SXSWi) conference in Austin and the four top pediatric hospitals in the country—Boston Children’s, Cincinnati Children’s, Texas Children’s and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia—the event will identify the most promising digital health and medical device innovations for pediatrics.

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CES offers a glimpse into the connected health future

Bluetooth pacifier thermometer CES Consumer Electronics Show health gadgets wearables
A Bluetooth pacifier/thermometer? (Photo: Bluemaestro

A Bluetooth pacifier that takes a baby’s temperature. An iPhone otoscope. A smart yoga mat. And health & fitness trackers out the wazoo. That’s just a small sampling of the health-related technologies showcased at last week’s Consumer Electronics Show (or CES).

The Las Vegas-based annual trade fair, a weeklong playdate for gadgetphiles, largely focuses on TVs, computers, cameras, entertainment and mobile gear. This year it also had a robust health and biotech presence, with more than 300 health and biotech exhibitors.

“I witnessed literally hundreds of companies all vying for the wrists and attention of users,” Michael Docktor, MD, Boston Children’s Hospital’s clinical director of innovation and director of clinical mobile solutions, wrote on BetaBoston. “For me, it was a chance to see where medicine and health care are headed.”

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3D printing helps doctors plan a toddler’s craniofacial surgery

Plastic surgeon John Meara, MD, and neurosurgeon Mark Proctor, MD, in the Craniofacial Anomalies Program at Boston Children’s Hospital are early adopters of 3D printing technology. They put it to good use in caring for Violet, a buoyant toddler who was diagnosed before birth with a rare, complicated skull and facial defect. Using CT images, and with the help of the hospital’s Simulator Program, they were able to build a series of plastic 3D models of Violet’s skull and rehearse her surgery—months before Violet arrived from Oregon.

“I actually feel like I know her, because I’ve seen that model change and grow over the last several months,” said Meara just before the surgery. “We can see and feel the trajectory of where we will have to make certain cuts, and that’s never been possible before.”

Read more on 3D printing in medicine in the Boston Globe. Follow Violet’s journey in this four-part series, and in The New York Times.

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Intelligent ICU monitoring for patients in status epilepticus: BurSIn

The BurSIn system, in development, interprets EEG data along several key parameters and accurately identifies burst and suppression patterns.
The BurSIn system, in development, interprets EEG data along several key parameters and accurately identifies burst and suppression patterns.

Status epilepticus, a life-threatening form of persistent seizure activity in the brain, is challenging to treat. It requires hospitalization in an intensive care unit, constant monitoring and meticulous medication adjustment. An automated, intelligent monitoring system developed by clinicians and engineers at Boston Children’s Hospital could transform ICU care for this neurological emergency.

Typically, children in status epilepticus are first given powerful, short-acting seizure medications. If their seizures continue, they may need to be placed in a medically induced coma, using long-acting sedatives or general anesthetics. “The goal,” explains biomedical engineer Christos Papadelis, PhD, “is to supply enough sedating medication to suppress brain activity and protect the brain from damage, while at the same time avoiding over-sedation.”

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15 health care predictions for 2015

Crystal ball fortuneteller-Shutterstock-cropped
2014 continued to see massive evolution in health care—from digital health innovations to the maturation of technologies in genomics, genome editing and regenerative medicine to the configuration of the health care system itself. We asked leaders from the clinical, research and business corners of Boston Children’s Hospital to weigh in with their forecasts for 2015. Click “Full story” for them all, or jump to:
The consumer movement in health care
Evolving care models
Genomics in medicine
Stem cell therapeutics
Therapeutic development
New technology
Biomedical research

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