From the category archives:

Innovators’ stories

BCH_InnoSummit14_FriedNaomi-2

Some innovators, Naomi Fried, PhD, chief innovation officer at Boston Children’s Hospital, says, can end up alone on an island and make something out of just sand and water. But a lot of other innovators could benefit from getting help. In her role as lead of Boston Children’s Innovation Acceleration Program, Fried and her team help established and potential innovators alike connect with that help: navigating vendor/manufacturer contracts, accessing specialists like designers and coders, and raising funding. “You can’t have an innovative organization unless you have a plan and a structure for that.” Full story »

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nascar-pediatric-innovation-summit

At first, Peter Waters, MD, was a bit puzzled when he was asked to present at the 2014 Global Pediatric Innovation + Awards. Unlike some of his colleagues at Boston Children’s Hospital, Waters, the hospital’s orthopedic surgeon-in-chief, hadn’t developed an orthopedic widget or led groundbreaking scientific research. But his innovation could ultimately be even more important.

Waters has leveraged an unlikely partnership with the NASCAR racing team Hendrick Motorsports to inject new levels of safety and collaboration into pediatric orthopedic surgery departments across the United States. Full story »

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Hematopoietic hierarchy aging blood cell hematopoietic stem cell blood disorder Derrick Rossi

Blood-forming hematopoietic stem cells (top) give rise to all blood and immune cell types. In children with SCID, the steps leading to immune cells are broken.

In the world of fatal congenital immunodeficiency diseases, good news is always welcome, because most patients die before their first birthday if not treated. Babies with severe combined immunodeficiency disease, aka SCID or the “bubble boy disease,” now have more hope for survival thanks to two pieces of good news.

Transplants are looking up

First came a July paper in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) by the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium. This North American collaborative analyzed a decade’s worth of outcomes of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), currently the only standard treatment option for SCID that has a chance of providing a permanent cure. Full story »

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magnetic suturing needle

A magnetic needle and thread lets surgeons maneuver in tight spots.

The current method of suturing used in surgery—stitching with a needle and thread—has been around for thousands of years. Kaifeng Liu, MD, a research fellow at Boston Children’s Hospital, hopes to reimagine this fundamental operating room practice. His workbench is filled with various prototypes of a magnetic needle, a device he hopes will make suturing simpler, faster and more efficient for researchers and clinicians alike.

“Sometimes it is the simplest things in medicine that stay the same over time,” says Liu, whose invention will be featured later this week at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014 (October 30-31). Full story »

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Hackers at Hacking PediatricsParents, clinicians, app developers, designers and more had 18 hours to prototype digital healthcare solutions at Hacking Pediatrics, produced by Boston Children’s Hospital and MIT Hacking Medicine. To accompany our earlier post, we created this Storify. Full story »

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Hacking Pediatarics brainstorming wall

(Dana Hatic for MedTech Boston)

What are the pain points in pediatrics? There are at least 37: the number of clinicians, parents and others who lined up at the podium last weekend to pitch problems they hoped to solve at the second annual Hacking Pediatrics.

The hackathon, produced by Boston Children’s Hospital in collaboration with MIT Hacking Medicine, brought out many common themes: Helping kids with chronic illnesses track their symptoms, take their meds and avoid lots of clinic visits. Helping parents coordinate their children’s care and locate resources. Helping pediatric clinicians make better decisions with the right information at the right time.

Hackathons have a simple formula: Pitch. Mix. Hack. Get Feedback. Iterate. Repeat—as many times as possible. Full story »

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Global Pediatric Innovation Summit Awards big dataWhere is the next generation of therapeutic innovations going to come from? Population-level genomic studies? The fitness trackers on everyone’s wrist? Mining electronic medical records? People’s tweets, Yelps and Facebook posts?

How about all of the above?

What all of these things have in common is data. Lots of it. Some of it represents kinds of data that didn’t exist 5 or 10 years ago, but all of it is slowly beginning to fuel the pharma sector’s efforts to create the next blockbuster drug or targeted therapeutic.

At least, it should be. Full story »

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Shark Tanks in health care

Health care institutions, universities and even the U.S. government are helping innovators hone their pitches and get backing.

On ABC’s reality show “Shark Tank,” a panel of veteran investors listens to business pitches for everything from new dietary supplements to a nail salon for men. After asking tough questions, each shark either backs the venture—sometimes not for the reasons you’d think—or more likely declares, “I’m out.”

It’s a great infotainment formula—even my 10-year-old daughter is a fan—but it’s also a hit beyond the living room. Health care organizations are increasingly borrowing the “Shark Tank” script to get new ideas or to bankroll their own innovations. Boston Children’s Hospital is doing so at our Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards (Oct. 30-31), bringing in “Shark Tank”’s Daymond John to moderate. But we’re certainly not alone. In recent months: Full story »

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biofilm vaccine cholera

Through genetic engineering, this Vibrio cholerae biofilm can be loaded with extra antigens, creating a super-charged but inexpensive vaccine.

Malaria. Cholera. Now Ebola. Whatever the contagion, the need for new, or better, vaccines is a constant. For some of the most devastating public health epidemics, which often break out in resource-poor countries, vaccines have to be not only medically effective but also inexpensive. That means easy to produce, store and deliver.

Paula Watnick, MD, PhD, an infectious disease specialist at Boston Children’s Hospital, has a plan that stems from her work on cholera: using a substance produced by the bacteria themselves to make inexpensive and better vaccines against them.

Cells do all the work

Bacteria produce biofilms—a sticky, tough material composed of proteins, DNA and sugars—to help them attach to surfaces and survive. Full story »

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Ivan Salgo Philips HealthcareIvan Salgo, MD, MBA, is Senior Director, Cardiology, Philips Ultrasound.

I’m thrilled to be part of the judging panel for the Innovation Tank at Boston Children’s Hospital’s upcoming Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards. I can’t imagine a better way to bring together a duly combustible mixture of new thoughts and ideas with the spark of innovation.

It’s very clear that the pace of innovation needs to accelerate.

The Innovation Tank provides a rich and engaging way to accelerate innovation by putting the best ideas and technologies in front of people who can incubate and fund them, and ultimately, take them to success.

The genius of the Innovation Tank is that it coalesces a critical mass of people and ideas in a single place. By bringing ideas to the front through competition, participants can raise the bar on their own creativity to bring forth compelling ideas that matter to medicine, that matter to peoples’ lives.   Full story »

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