From the category archives:

Global health

Ebola response ethics experimental treatment therapy ZMapp

Guinean Red Cross volunteers prepare to decontaminate a hospital in the capital, Conakry. (European Commission DG ECHO/Flickr)

The world paused for a moment when the news broke last week that two Ebola-infected American missionaries working in Liberia had received an experimental therapy called ZMapp. As I write this, both patients are back on U.S. soil, and seem to be responding well to the treatment.

But was it ethical?

That difficult question can be divided into two. First is the question of whether it was ethical to give the two patients a drug that, up to that point, had never been tested in people. The second—in some ways thornier—question is: Was it ethical to give the treatment to two Americans but not the nearly 1,850 West Africans infected in the outbreak (as of August 11)? Full story »

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global health innovationZulfiqar Bhutta, MBBS, PhD, inaugural chair in global child health at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, and founding director of the Center of Excellence in Women and Child Health, Aga Khan University, Pakistan, is a global child health superstar. Presidents, prime ministers and princes welcome his advice. Yet India ignored him when he called its proposed innovation to curb infant mortality “nonsense.” “I was dead wrong,” says Bhutta. “What happened is remarkable.”

The simple innovation, which Bhutta now publicly commends, cut perinatal mortality 25 percent. Full story »

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This interactive map of the Ebola outbreak, produced by HealthMap, paints a picture of the epidemic's course from its first public signs in March. Mouse around, scroll down, zoom and explore. And click play to see how events have unfolded thus far.

Sobering news keeps coming out of the West African Ebola outbreak. According to numbers released on August 6, the virus has sickened 1,711 and claimed 932 lives across four nations. The outbreak continues to grow, with a high risk of continued regional spread, according to a threat analysis released by HealthMap (an outbreak tracking system operated out of Boston Children’s Hospital) and Bio.Diaspora (a Canadian project that monitors communicable disease spread via international travel).

“What we’ve seen here—because of inadequate public health measures, because of general fear—is [an outbreak that] truly hasn’t been kept under control,” John Brownstein, PhD, co-founder of HealthMap and a computational epidemiologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, told ABC News. “The event started, calmed down and jumped up again. Now, we’re seeing movement into densely populated areas, which is highly concerning.”

If you’re interested in keeping tabs on the outbreak yourself, there are several tools that can help. Full story »

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Three teenagers wearing hospital masks flu influenza healthmap social media twitter digital epidemiology digital disease detectionElaine Nsoesie, PhD, is a research fellow at Boston Children’s Hospital’s HealthMap, Harvard Medical School and Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. In this post, which originally appeared on HealthMap’s Disease Daily, Nsoesie looks at the trend of detecting disease digitally by monitoring mentions on social media. She delves into one of the major limitations of this technique—namely telling those who are curious about a disease apart from those who actually have it.

There are plenty of studies about tracking diseases (such as influenza) using digital data sources, which is awesome! However, many of these studies focus solely on matching the trends in the digital data sources (for example, searches on disease-related terms, or how frequently certain disease-related terms are mentioned on social media over time, etc.) to data from official sources such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although this approach is useful in telling us about the possible utility of these data, there are several limitations. One of the main limitations is the difficulty in distinguishing between data generated by healthy individuals and individuals who are actually sick. In other words, how can we tell whether someone who searches Google or Wikipedia for influenza is sick or just curious about the flu?

Researchers at Penn State University have developed a system that seeks to deal with this limitation. We spoke to the lead author, Todd Bodnar, about the study titled, On the Ground Validation of Online Diagnosis with Twitter and Medical Records. Full story »

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(Photo: Crossroads Foundation https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode)

(Photo: Crossroads Foundation https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode)

The United Nations global Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for 2015 aim to cut mortality among children younger than 5 by two-thirds. As 2015 approaches, there’s a sense of hope: By 2012, the 1990 base annual figure of 12 million was nearly halved, in part through curbing infectious diseases.

However, two under-recognized, highly preventable chronic conditions—spina bifida and hydrocephalus—have not declined in low- and middle-income countries. Each year, there are an estimated 200,000 new cases of infant hydrocephalus in sub-Saharan Africa alone, and 100,000 neural tube defects in India alone. As other causes of death and disability recede, data suggest that spina bifida and hydrocephalus are gaining a larger share of mortality in young children.

A multi-institution conference at Boston Children’s Hospital on April 11 sounded a global call to action, convening a mix of surgeons, pediatric neurologists, international patient advocacy groups, food fortification proponents, health economists, obstetricians, neuroscientists and others. Many innovative approaches are being explored, including two that caught Vector’s eye. Full story »

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medical costsCan putting a price tag on childhood obesity propel treatment and prevention efforts into comprehensive action? Perhaps, says David Ludwig, MD, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital.

Although the U.S. Task Force on Childhood Obesity set a goal of dropping obesity prevalence among youth to 5 percent by 2030, efforts have failed to make a significant dent. Recent data indicate only slight dips in obesity prevalence among 6- to 19-year-olds in some states. And other data show that the prevalence of extreme obesity in children continues to rise.

With nearly 20 percent of U.S. children tipping the scales as obese, policymakers need not only to act but also to justify the investment in childhood obesity treatment and prevention programs.

Duke University researchers offered a helping hand in a review article in the April 7 online Pediatrics, estimating the incremental lifetime direct medical cost of childhood obesity. Their economic model showed a $19,000 incremental lifetime medical cost of an obese child relative to a normal-weight youth.

Ludwig, who directs the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center Boston Children’s Hospital, provides insights into the next steps. Full story »

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Ibeziako,PatriciaPatricia Ibeziako, MD, directs the Boston Children’s Hospital Global Partnerships for Psychiatry Observership Program and the Psychiatry Consultation Service at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Children and adolescents constitute almost a third of the world’s population—2.2 billion individuals—and almost 90 percent live in low-income and middle-income countries, where they form up to half of the population. Yet, for many years, child mental health has largely been glossed over—with long-term negative effects on educational attainment in addition to chronic disability and lost productivity.

Major international non-governmental organizations and United Nations agencies work in settings where children are at risk for mental health difficulties. However, with the exception of the World Health Organization (WHO), these agencies often fail to acknowledge or focus on child mental health issues. In 2005, the WHO Atlas of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Resources reported that less than one third of 66 countries surveyed had an entity with sole responsibility for child mental health programming, and that national budgets rarely had identifiable funding for child mental health services. Full story »

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Last week, Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation Acceleration Program hosted a jam-packed Innovators’ Showcase where teams from around the hospital networked, traded ideas and showed off their projects. Here are a few Vector thinks are worth watching.

isotropic diffusion reveals information on axons on DTI1. An imaging ‘biomarker’ after concussion

Thirty percent of people who suffer a mild traumatic brain injury—a.k.a. concussion—have ongoing symptoms that can last months or years. If patients at risk could be identified, they could receive early interventions such as brain cooling and anti-seizure medications. New MRI protocols that can measure free, non-directional diffusion of water, coupled with sophisticated analytics, are achieving unprecedented pictures of what happens inside the brain after injury. Full story »

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superamma

Judith Palfrey, MD, is director of the Global Pediatrics Program in the Department of Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Diarrhea is a bigger global killer than HIV and malaria combined. It accounts for more than 800,000 deaths each year among children 0-5 years. And how tragic this is when the simple intervention of hand washing can prevent some of these deaths. Results of a trial, published in the March edition of The Lancet Global Health, indicate that teaching families in under-resourced areas of the world about hand washing is not only possible but also scalable, sustainable and successful—if it’s done the right way.

Hand washing is a simple intervention, but the prevalence of the behavior is as low as 1 to 2 percent in some under-resourced global settings. A London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine group, led by Adam Biran, PhD, decided to try to improve these statistics by devising an effective intervention.

However, the route to simple solutions is often complex. The researchers used very sophisticated methodology to identify the levers of behavioral change. They realized that health messages about hand washing have not worked. The idea that what I do today may prevent diarrhea down the road just did not have enough oomph to motivate people to adopt a new routine.

The researchers hypothesized that emotional drivers (including nurture, status, disgust and belonging) would be strong pushes to get families to wash their hands. And they were right. Full story »

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A project that set out to build better shunts ended with potential ways to help kids avoid them altogether.

A project that set out to build better shunts ended with potential ways to help kids avoid shunts altogether.

Shunts often are surgically placed in the brains of infants with hydrocephalus to drain excess cerebrospinal fluid. Unfortunately, these devices eventually fail, and the problem is hard to detect until the child shows neurologic symptoms. CT and MRI scans may then be performed to check for a blockage of flow—followed by urgent neurosurgery if the shunt has failed.

Early detection of shunt failure was the problem pitched last fall at Hacking Pediatrics in Boston. Two bioengineers, Christopher Lee, a PhD student at Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology program, and Babak Movassaghi, PhD, an MBA candidate at MIT Sloan, took the bait.

“We heard that parents would not take vacations in areas without an experienced neurosurgeon around,” says Movassaghi, a former Philips Healthcare engineer with 32 patents in cardiology and electrophysiology. “We were intrigued to solve that.” Full story »

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