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Alexandra Pelletier

Google Glass worn by Alex Pelletier croppedAlexandra Pelletier is a manager in the Innovation Acceleration Programat Boston Children’s Hospital. She directs the FastTrack Innovation in Technology Program, a hospital initiative to accelerate, rapidly develop and deliver innovative clinical software solutions.

Do you know the feeling of opening a new box with technology in it? I’m not a tech geek, but when my Google Glass arrived, with its crisp and simple packaging, my visceral reaction was “this is really cool.” Nonetheless, I’m approaching Glass carefully, because even the best technologies still require humans to use them. That means that they must be easy to use, must connect with other systems seamlessly and must offer value that makes its adoption worthwhile.

Google Glass is gaining some real excitement in health care. Each day my Twitter feed lights up with a new report of a hospital or practice trying it out. Here at Boston Children’s, we too are investigating the use of this technology through the Google Glass Explorer Program (watch Vector for more to come). We see promising potential for Google’s head-mounted display technology to transform communication and access to real-time information. Full story »

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Google logo with applesAlexandra Pelletier is the Digital Health Program Manager in the Innovation Acceleration Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. She manages the FastTrack Innovation in Technology Award, an initiative to accelerate, rapidly develop and deliver innovative clinical software solutions to improve patient experience and operational efficiency.

When the largest and most innovative technology companies in the world invest, radical disruption follows. Google and Apple, multibillion-dollar companies operating across the globe, are already deeply embedded into most of our lives. They now want to bring their network and reach to health care.

Their new investments could completely transform how patient data are captured and how information is shared. Through their big data capabilities, they’re well placed to rapidly evolve health care delivery processes. In the very near future, I expect we will see connected sensors or “smart” devices of all kinds begin to integrate into our lives, weaving a web of quantified data into actionable health information and changing how patient and care providers engage together.

Consider some recent events. First, there was Google’s buzz-generating meeting with the FDA. Full story »

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